wynd

1) An alley or narrow lane in a built-up area, often at right angles to the main street.

It is found in the north and east of the county and the earliest references are in undated thirteenth-century charters for Yarm: in venella que vocatur le Crossewend

in venella jacentibus quod dicitur le Kyrkewend. Later examples there suggest that the clerk may have been ‘translating’ a word: 1649 a vennell or common weind or lane

1660 a common weinde or loaning, Yarm. It is found as a by-name in the East Riding: 1381 Robertus at Weynde, Southburn and in some other east Yorkshire towns: 1442-3 'a toft lying in le Wend in Tadecastre as the road se extendit towards the church and abutted on the high street'

1505 a burgage in Richmond lying in a street called Franchgate ... abutting on lee Kirkeweynde.

spellings wend (2) weind
dates 1200-1299 1381 1442-1443 1505 1649 1660

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Photo by Kreuzschnabel CC BY-SA 3.0